How Do Diabetes Drugs Set the Stages for Diseases?

Majid Ali, M.D.

The simple answer: All persons with Type 2 diabetes suffer from excess insulin and insulin toxicity, and all diabetes drugs increase the degrees of insulin toxicity. Excess insulin is acidifying, “free-radicalizing,” inflaming, and increases the buildup of grease in fat cells. By these molecular mechanisms, all diabetes drugs increase the risk of heart attacks, stroke, cancer, kidney failure, and blindness. Most people will be surprised—many deeply distressed—by my statement. I cite specific data to support my position.

In May and June, 2010, I published in Townsend Letter my analysis of four-hour insulin profiles of my 122 patients (see Tables 1 and 2 for detailed data). Below is brief text from my Townsend Letter article that shed light on how insulin toxicity and diabetes develops:

I proposed a crank-crank-shaft model of insulin resistancehyperinsulinemiadevelops as the pancreas gears up hormone production to overcome developing resistance of the cell membrane to insulin. Succinctly stated, in this model the crank of insulin (5,808 daltons) fails to “move” (activate) the crank-shaft of insulin receptors in the “hardened” cell membranes—the crank-shaft is rusted, turned, and twisted, so to speak—so rendering insulin dysfunctional. The crankshaft of insulin receptor is roughly 70 times larger than the insulin crank.

To explain “hardening of cell membranes,” I proposed the Grease and Detergent Model in which biomembranes and matrix are covered with “cellular grease” due to insufficient detergent functions of the body. The grease is composed of cellular waste, molecular debris, rancid (oxidized) lipids, sticky sugars (glycosylated proteins and lipids), and pulped (misfolded) proteins. The primary detergent in the body is oxygen, with secondary “oxy-detergents,” such as hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, hydroxyl radicals, oxygen-activated enzymes, and grease-eating phagocytes.

How Do Diabetes Drugs Cause Heart Attacks, Stroke, Cancer, Kidney Failure, and Blindness?

The simple answer: All persons with Type 2 diabetes suffer from excess insulin and insulin toxicity, and all diabetes drugs increase the degrees of insulin toxicity. Excess insulin is acidifying, “free-radicalizing,” inflaming, and increases the buildup of grease in fat cells. By these molecular mechanisms, all diabetes drugs increase the risk of heart attacks, stroke, cancer, kidney failure, and blindness. Most people will be surprised—many deeply distressed—by my statement. I cite specific data to support my position.

In May and June, 2010, I published in Townsend Letter my analysis of four-hour insulin profiles of my 122 patients (see Tables 1 and 2 for detailed data). Below is brief text from my Townsend Letter article that shed light on how insulin toxicity and diabetes develops:

I proposed a crank-crank-shaft model of insulin resistancehyperinsulinemiadevelops as the pancreas gears up hormone production to overcome developing resistance of the cell membrane to insulin. Succinctly stated, in this model the crank of insulin (5,808 daltons) fails to “move” (activate) the crank-shaft of insulin receptors in the “hardened” cell membranes—the crank-shaft is rusted, turned, and twisted, so to speak—so rendering insulin dysfunctional. The crankshaft of insulin receptor is roughly 70 times larger than the insulin crank.

To explain “hardening of cell membranes,” I proposed the Grease and Detergent Model in which biomembranes and matrix are covered with “cellular grease” due to insufficient detergent functions of the body. The grease is composed of cellular waste, molecular debris, rancid (oxidized) lipids, sticky sugars (glycosylated proteins and lipids), and pulped (misfolded) proteins. The primary detergent in the body is oxygen, with secondary “oxy-detergents,” such as hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, hydroxyl radicals, oxygen-activated enzymes, and grease-eating phagocytes.

Avandia Causes Heart Attacks and Strokes

Consider the following quote from The New York Times of June 28, 2010:

Two studies published in influential medical journals and using very different methods found that Avandia, a controversial diabetes medicine made by GlaxoSmithKline, substantially increased patients’ heart risks.

The most disturbing aspect of the problem is revealed by the following quote from The New York Times (July 13, 2010):

In the fall of 1999, the drug giant SmithKline Beecham secretly began a study to find out if its diabetes medicine, Avandia, was safer for the heart than a competing pill, Actos, made by Takeda. Avandia’s success was crucial to SmithKline, whose labs were otherwise all but barren of new products. But the study’s results, completed that same year, were disastrous. Not only was Avandia no better than Actos, but the study also provided clear signs that it was riskier to the heart.

If the above does not take your breath away, consider the following from the Time’s article:

But the latest documents demonstrate that the company had data hinting at Avandia’s extensive heart problems almost as soon as the drug was introduced in 1999, and sought intensively to keep those risks from becoming public.[italics added]

The New York Times focused on the relative greater toxicity of Avandia over Actos. I predict that when Actos is finally compared with the efficacy and safety of nondrug therapies that restore cell membranes and insulin receptor function, it will also be found to cause heart attacks and strokes. And so will all other diabetes drugs, regardless of their short-term benefits, to varying degrees. I repeat all diabetes drugs increase insulin toxicity and worsen insulin receptor dysfunction.

Diabetes Drugs and Increased Risk of Cancer
It is widely known that diabetes increases the rates of all cancers for which this association has been investigated. What is not recognized is that it is insulin toxicity that increases the risk of cancer. It is true that raised blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) increases blood acidity and oxidative stress; however, it must be recognized that blood sugar levels rise because of insulin receptor dysfunction caused by greasy cell membranes. Diabetes drugs worsen insulin receptor dysfunction.

My assertion that diabetes drugs increase the risk of cancer must not be dismissed as mere conjecture. In 2007, researchers at University of Vermont reported higher rates of cancer among patients receiving Avandia. I also predict that other diabetes drugs will also be found to increase the risk of cancer when they are finally compared with the efficacy and safety of nondrug therapies that restore cell membranes and insulin receptor function.

Diabetes Drugs Cause Kidney Failure and Blindness
In over 90% of cases, kidney failure and blindness are caused by the dangerous trio of insulin toxicity, obesity, and high blood pressure. Again the underlying molecular mechanisms are excess acidity, incremental free radical activity, and clotting-unclotting dysequilibrium in all bodily fluids. All diabetes drugs increase the degrees of these toxic processes.

Insulin Toxicity and Insulin-Reduction Program
There is only one way to diagnose insulin toxicity: Do a three-hour insulin profile. In my view all persons who are fifteen pounds or more above their optimal weight should have such a profile to detect insulin toxicity. The subjects of insulin toxicity and insulin reduction programs are discussed at length in companion tutorials.

Patient Compliance for Insulin-Reduction Program
Nearly all mainstream doctors limit their work to prescribing drugs for diabetes without doing insulin profiles. Such doctors are likely to look at my guidelines for insulin reduction and protest that my suggested program is idealistic and their patients will not comply. Their argument has some merit. My response: Insulin-toxic individuals deserve full information about the devastating long-term consequences of insulin toxicity and insulin-reduction plans. Then it is up to them whether to not to comply.

In closing, all drugs that increase insulin activity—that is all diabetes drugs—do not address any of the toxicities of foods, environment, and thoughts. Indeed, by masking the effects of such toxicities, these drugs worsen the underlying problems—buildup of grease on cell membranes, insulin receptors dysfunction, and resulting insulin toxicity—and increase the rates of heart attacks, stroke, cancer, kidney failure, and blindness.

Table 1. Distribution of Fasting Insulin Levels, Expressed in uU/mL, in Consecutive 122 Four-Hour Insulin Profiles

< 2 ul/mL

(N=24)

2-5 ul/mL

(N=27)

6-15 ul/mL

(N=49)

16-25 ul/mL

(N=13)

26-60 ul/mL

(N=9)

Females

(n=78)

15

(12.3%)

16

(13.1%)

33

(27%)

8

(6,5%)

6

(5.3%)

Males

(n=44)

9

7.3%

11

9.0%

16

13.1

5

4.1%

3

2.4%

Table 2. Distribution of Peak Insulin Levels (in 50 uU/mL) of 122 Profiles in Six Categories

Insulin uIU/mL

< 50

51-100

101-150

151-200

201-300

“>300

Females

(n=78)

26

(21.3%)

33

(27%)

16

(13.1%)

1

(0.8%)

1

(0.8%)

1 (0.8%)

Males

(n=44)

14

(11.4%)

13

(10.6%)

15

(12.3%)

0

2

(12.3%

0

 

Ethics-in-Medicine, Inc. was organized to advocat

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